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20130202
20130210
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CSPAN 16
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Search Results 0 to 15 of about 16 (some duplicates have been removed)
hard. >> over the years, we have seen google and facebook and the washington offices grow and then some. we didn't interview with that executive vice president of samsung earlier at ces. and he said -- we did an interview with that executive vice president of samsung earlier at ces. he said that they have someone in washington. >> microsoft did not have much of a washington office. you would have the justice department going after you on something else and then congress passes a law and you throw business plans out the window. the reality today is that there are so many conflict in interests that if someone has an advantage in washington will write some rules to benefit them. that can undo your business plan. we are a full democracy. what other countries, it is different. google learned the hard way are. but google has been successful. they learned the hard way if you do not have a washington presence. let us innovate on our own. then the rules changed and that was out the window. >> what do you miss about congress? >> very little. i miss the members, but with the dysfunctionality, i'm
worldwide. we are mostly small to medium businesses. most people think the internet is amazon.com and google, microsoft, abel, those are the exceptions. rule is small businesses. small businesses that are in power in small-business is. -- empower small businesses. that is why we're here. >> how is everybody doing today? i am from detroit and i run a couple of start-ups. i spent most of my day working on a university. what we do is help start-ups to be able to leverage technology to tell their stories online. this to give you some background, i have the opportunity to be a part of being in the silicon valley. but there really is, it opened my eyes to this whole ecosystem and how the world works. the perspective by want to bring is how do cities and states change their minds from an investor perspective? i'm from detroit and if you look at detroit, detroit is changing. how does a town that has been a factory town reinvent itself? how does it disintegrated tried to create high growth and jobs and a place where now we have to get the local government and we have to get the community working toge
there was an article refering to samsung as the fifth horseman, i'm sure you've stheen apple, amazon, google and facebook are the big four but in this author's view samsung should be included in that list as a driver of the future. >> certainly it's nice to have recognition of invasion. i don't know about those groups which our focus is to stay humble and hungry on invasion. to drive new products and leverage investment in design and keep pushing things in terms of bringing new technology to the market. finding areas like the camera market we can bring invasion. finding areas like home appliances we can bring invasion. we'll keep inviting and vesting in new technology and leave others to make the comp sons and you future predictions. >> how closely do you work with google or facebook or microsoft, is there a lot of cooperation with companies that have shared goals? >> we partner with a lot of companies. samsung is the largest tech company by sales in the world which we partner with lots of others. we know what we are good at which is making device. that's where we want to stay focused and we
the world has ever known. after all, immigrants help to start businesses like google, and yahoo!, they created entire new industries that in turn created new jobs and new prosperity. in recent years, one in four high-tech start-ups in america were founded by immigrants. one in four new small business owners were immigrants, including right here in nevada. folks who came here seeking opportunity and now want to share that opportunity with other americans. but we all know that today we have an immigration system that is out of date and badly broken. a system that is holding us back, instead of helping us to grow our economy and strengthen our middle-class. right now, we have 11 million undocumented immigrants in america. 11 million men and women from all over the world who live their lives in the shadows. yes, they broke rules, they crossed the border illegally, maybe they overstayed their visas. those are the facts, nobody disputes them. but these 11 million men and women are here. many of them have been here for years. and the overwhelming majority of these individuals are not l
. china blocking global -- blocking google is giving their -- the discussions in dubai last month showed growing interest in regimes to control the internet. i hope that the congress working with the administration will lay out clear statutory negotiating instructions that require that it seek as part of these trade agreements open internet discipline. it ought to start with the trans-pacific and into all major trade discussion. let me close with this. i remember starting in this whole discussion when i had a full head of hair and rugged good looks -- when i came to the senate in 1995. not very long after that people saw the congress was getting quickly into the issues and the internet as compared to a series of tubes. you all remember that discussion. when you look back at what has been achieved -- i guess you would have to say 15 years, no more. there would be secondary liabilities for websites. an enormous amount of progress has been made culminating in the wind over pipa and sopa. there is a lot more heavy lifting to do. i think there is an opportunity for a coalition of leaders to g
. immigrant businesses have grown at 2.5 times the national average. i also said i am glad that google is in mountain view rather than moscow. google was founded by an immigrant, but it is worth noting that none of the founders came to the united states because of their skills. they all came here through a family based system or because they were refugees or the children of refugees. risk-taking, a desire for a better life. these are among the most desired values in our country. it is the secret sauce that makes america great. from alexander hamilton to andrew carnegie to albert einstein, we get our nation forged by immigrants. it is time we fully embrace that immigration is good for our country. it is time to do are tour part. thank you very much, mr. chairman. >> thank you. all other members opening statements will be made a part of the record. we will turn now to our distinguished panel. i will begin by introducing the first panel. our first witness on this panel is mr. vivek wadhwa, a visiting scholar at the university of california berkeley. a senior research associate at harvard
significant startup companies, the silicon valley success stories were from yahoo, google, intel, they did not come to this country through the highly skilled immigrant visa program, but through other means of immigration. there is an interview on november 20, 2012 at the wharton school of business. their distinguished school in pennsylvania. you stated, "i was in new york in the 1960s as a child. being in america is quite an experience. i left in the late 60s, but i always wanted to come back. the first chance i got was in 1980 when my father got transferred to the consulate in new york city." would you agree based on your own experiences in america that the notion of family unification, of the unit being together, has been and should continue to be an integral art of what we do when it comes to comprehensive immigration law. >> there is no dispute on that. the only thing i argue about is that -- we want to bring in additional skilled workers and grow the economy. >> your own experience the measures importance of family importance. >> you are right. the children are immigrants -- that is
, tennessee, did and now they're becoming a health care center. google is spending all of that money in kansas city. we have got to be more comfortable in talking to people about what works. what is working that other countries are doing. the diversity of the representation in the house will be helpful for that. i think also we have to learn something from how historically brave actions by your predecessors in this caucus played out in the electorate. when were they rewarded? when were they punished? and later rewarded? i cannot tell you how many nights in the white house, every single night before i went to bed, for months and months and months after the 1994 election, i thought about the people who were defeated because they voted for the economic program, because they voted for the assault weapons ban. i knew exactly what happened. i thought a lot about those who survived and why they did. as you look ahead and you decide, what are we going to do about the budget, what are we going to do about having the democrats branded as the party of jobs and innovation for the future? make no mistake a
the internet, g.p.s., google, the iphone and, god, what would we do without barograph codes? i expect we'll hear more examples from the witnesses and we could probably spend our entire hearing reading off such a list. and yet i fear some of my colleagues in congress will still be unimpressed. we'll still hear arguments that the federal government's role should be restricted to so-called basic research because the private citizen can do the rest alone. not everybody has to take a cut. that is the 8.2% cuts loob looming on march 1 may hurt a bit. but are better for the country in the long run. i happen to believe personally that we can invest it in unemployment or food stamps or we can invest it in the future that will eliminate the need for both. so, let me attempt to briefly preempt some of these arguments. r&d is not simple. linear process from basic to applied to development and so on to a final commercial product. it also doesn't go in only one direction. r&d is part of a complex innovation process with many feedback loops. there's no clear line at which the public role ends and the p
is the poster child for creative destruction. the article was about google, microsoft, apple, and facebook. neither firm owns an fcc license or base station. now, entire commercial empires are floating on the spectrum markets made possible by those who when others cannot see how competition for work. i think tom whitehead for his contributions to our world. i do not blame him for the thousands of text messages a ninth grader made the producing over a one or two hour span. omg. [laughter]there is only so much vision that can be contained in one man. i will not link tom for this. i am delighted today with the amazing dedication of margaret whitehead and organizing and cattle learning that and cattle lording -- and logging this record. the historians and all students of communications may better understand our modern times and the world to come. this work is not available for inquiry through the library of congress. we alumina new insights. thank you kindly, mr. whitehead for this contribution to the american people and to scholars everywhere. [applause] >> thank you, gentlemen. i will see if
is as an engineer. if you google it, it is problem- solving. i came to washington to solve problems. unfortunately, as the problems have gotten bigger, congress has gotten smaller. not smaller in size or ego, but smaller in the ability to get things done. we are pulled in one direction or the other, we have to do this for our party or for this group or that group. what we need is for all of you to help us by reaching out to your representatives and tell them to join with us, and join with no labels. tell your representative to become a problem solver. it will give your representatives the incentive to join us and come together because in the end, we have to work together for our country to solve these problems. it is only going to have been not just because the 25 of us get together, but because the american people say we need to get things solved. we need you to solve them. this is not just up to us, it is up to every single person in this group. [applause] >> there is something important that happened here this morning. the semi you are represented here today, when they identified themselves, th
of you -- you know about the google and the system of tubes, i know. internet advertisers are mainly right. they know how to find your special niche, your special opportunities. for example, you order a couple bus size jackets and did the banner ad that says, lose 20 pounds in two days. i thought, if it works or that it has got to work if you order up a joke books. i will get an instant banner ad telling me how to be an instant stand up comedian in an hour or less. as of speech time, i checked the phone -- no banner ads. planned the has failed me. so i thought, i will talk until -- and tell you all that i used to be the north dakota state tax commissioner. [laughter] those of you who are familiar with north dakota state tax commissioner's -- kent conrad was a tax commissioner. i thought, i will just tell you stories about being the north dakota state tax commissioner. you all look panicked because you think this will be a discussion about the difference between earned and unearned income, which honestly you should write more about. but instead i will tell you why it is so different w
Search Results 0 to 15 of about 16 (some duplicates have been removed)